Haga in Gothenburg and Fika, Sweden’s Coffee Culture

Travel truly does educate. If I hadn’t flown to Gothenburg, I wouldn’t have known what this Fika thing is about. Fika is the Swede’s practice of taking a break from a day’s work and making time for friends. It’s a socialisation that relies heavily upon coffee (or tea) and a little snack. It’s more than a social behavior, it’s an important culture that, as I’ve read, the Swede’s are very proud of.

The first time I read about fika, I thought it was like taking a siesta minus the sleeping part. It is still, essentially, taking a break. I thought that this Swedish practice was making time for one’s self, and just letting go of the worries we’ve encountered in the day for a mere hour or so – while sipping that deliciously smelling coffee of course. Well, it is kinda. I was almost there. As I read more and more about fika, though, I learned that doing it by yourself is simply just a coffee and snack break. Although they’ve revolved fika around coffee as its most important factor, it isn’t just the mere drinking of coffee; its second most important factor is being able to make connections with the people who’ve gathered with us.

But still, I wanted to try fika. I thought I’d been doing fika all along whenever I went to coffee shops alone during my layovers. So I told myself, “since I’m in Sweden, I’m doing Fika too.” So I strut myself to Haga, Gothenburg’s famous neighborhood, known for it’s one street that’s lined with cafes, restaurants, and souvenir shops. It also had a Kawaii shop – yes, a shop filled with kawaii items like Sailormoon’s clothes and TONS of Pikachu products – and a Unicorn and Sons store, which sold multiple items with either pictures of unicorns or unicorn horns on them! EXCITING.

haga-gothenburg

haga-gothenburg-sweden
it’s an instagrammable street
haga-street-gothenburg-sweden
Here’s a bike displayed just outside the Kawaii Shop.

But I digress.

So after setting foot on the street and admiring the trinkets on display and the people sitting in the restaurants, I searched for my very own cafe to kill time in. By the end of the street stood Cafe Hebbe Lelle, which sold Sweden’s famous cinnamon buns known for their bigger-than-normal size (for a vague point of reference, they’re bigger than my face). Since I have such a sweet tooth, I was lured in. I ordered that and a cappuccino, and spent my afternoon in that one spot.

fika-haga-gothenburg-sweden

 

 

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